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    • [True] Stories Project
      The [True] Stories project aims to support classroom-centered, multidisciplinary, and collaborative oral history curricula for undergraduates at three Liberal Arts Colleges (Rollins College, Davidson College, and Southwestern University).
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    • 500 Years of Discovering Florida
      This exhibit was prepared by eleven students for an Honors College class "Major Works/Ideas" in the Spring of 2012. Under the supervision of librarian-instructor Andy Huse, each student's assignment was to present an aspect of Florida's history or culture using only materials from USF Tampa Library's Special Collections. The summary below is culled from their written introduction. "In this exhibit, we will explore the history of what is now the state of Florida, including the culture of the Indian tribes that predated European presence by thousands of years, the technological advances that allowed the peninsula’s population and economy to develop into one of the largest of the 50 states, and the development of the tourism industry (and other related fields) that became the state’s trademark into the 21st century. We will present a narrative of Florida’s development based on historical photos and documents, as well as modern texts and accounts of the state’s history."
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    • Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition
      The Charles Brockden Brown Electronic Archive and Scholarly Edition is a project dedicated to publishing the uncollected writings of Charles Brockden Brown. Our edition builds on, supplements, and contextualizes the Bicentennial Edition of The Novels and Related Works, published between 1977 and 1987 under the general editorship of Sydney J. Krause and S. W. Reid. Consisting of six volumes and containing the novels Wieland (1977), Arthur Mervyn (1980), Ormond (1983), Edgar Huntly (1984), Clara Howard and Jane Talbot (1986), and the dialogue Alcuin (1987), the Bicentennial Edition became a landmark in modern Brown scholarship. Paperback editions of individual novels based on the Kent State University Press texts have since been published for classroom use, and Sydney J. Krause edited a one-volume edition of three novels for the Library of America. This has done much to re-establish Brown as an important novelist in the American canon. The Bicentennial Edition, however, constitutes no more than half of Brown’s writings; not represented are (at present count) 546 printed texts and 183 letters. This count includes his book, theater and music reviews, philosophical essays, reflections on law, religion, nationhood, geography, history, literature, political economy, medicine, science, and sexuality, as well as his short fiction, letters, and poetry. (Only letters and poems survive in manuscript form.)
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    • Colors of Ozu
      Colors of Ozu is a film analysis project that leverages digital tools to novelly and creatively examine the final six films of Japanese filmmaker Yasujirō Ozu (1903-1963). These works—which include Equinox Flower (1958), Good Morning (1959), Floating Weeds (1959), Late Autumn (1960), The End of Summer (1961), and An Autumn Afternoon (1962)—are also unique in their oeuvre for being the only films the prolific director and screenwriter even produced in color. While nearly all of Ozu’s films have been widely regarded and studied for their distinctive visual style, relationship to Japanese society and culture, and other aesthetic and narrative qualities, little critical attention has been given to investigating Ozu’s use of color at the end of their career. Colors of Ozu seeks a dual purpose in adding this element to the existing, broad field of criticism around Ozu’s work and applying the tools and methods of digital humanities (DH) research to strengthen the bond between DH and film/media studies.
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    • Demos Project for the Study of Data Humanities
      The Demos Project for Studies in the Data Humanities fosters and supports scholarship involving structured data around people (Greek δῆμος) and their environment. At the Demos Project, we examine the representation of individuals and communities in data, we ask and answer questions about data in society, and we apply humanistic thinking to data-driven problems. Questions of data representation have broad applicability but are particularly effective for reading and understanding contemporary problems. The representation of people and communities in data is an issue of significant current interest as more and more of our lives are lived online. This project builds upon FSU’s historic strengths in intersectional studies of race, gender, language and society.
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    • Digital Library of the Caribbean
      The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) is a cooperative digital library for resources from and about the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean. The dLOC partner institutions are the core of dLOC. dLOC partners retain all rights to their materials and provide access to digitized versions of Caribbean cultural, historical and research materials currently held in archives, libraries, and private collections.
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    • Every Tongue Got To Confess
      "Every Tongue Got To Confess" is hosted by Professors of History Julian Chambliss (Rollins College) and Robert Cassanello (University of Central Florida). In the same spirit as Zora Neale Hurston - famous African American novelist, short story writer, folklorist, and anthropologist - this podcast explores the experiences and stories of communities of color. All podcasts are brought to you by The Association to Preserve the Eatonville Community (the official sponsor of the Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities) as well the Department of History at Rollins College and its Africa and African American Studies Program.
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    • Executive Board
      This is the private club for the FLDH eBoard.
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    • FIU Digital Collection participation
      The Local History Archives at the Boynton Beach City Library is participating in a regional initiative to make digital collections accessible, through the Florida International University's Digital Collections.
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    • Florida Digital Postcards Exhibit
      The Florida Digital Postcard exhibit is a curated presentation of the digitized images from The Hampton Dunn Florida Postcard collection housed in the University of South Florida Libraries Special Collections. An output of the first stage in the full-scale digitization of the collection, this exhibit features over three hundred postcards on Hillsborough County. Drawn mostly from the first half of the twentieth century (and many from the Golden Age of Postcards), the images bring to view the streets, waterways, industry and society from the founding of modern Tampa. The exhibit provides a visual history of significant events and everyday life, of buildings and travel, of nostalgia and progress that characterized Florida. Inscribed with brief narratives of correspondents, the cards record the voices of travelers, businessmen, separated friends and family who passed through this place in history. Filled with alligators and airplanes, palm trees and bridges, the postcards raise questions about how people approached this exotic and fruitful land in the days before air conditioning. The cards invite us to join them in the past and re-envision the place we inhabit now.
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    • Golden Personalities
      Since its founding in 1885, Winter Park has been the home of Rollins, "set like a gem amid the water blue," the College and the town have grown together over the past 124 years; each has drawn from and shared with the other in a symbiotic relationship. Noted one resident: "Winter Park would not today be the community of cultivated people that it is without the presence of the College. On the other hand a college without a town and there are some is a less interesting and vibrant place to be." To explore and celebrate this heritage, a student-faculty collaborative research project was launched in summer 2009. Hamilton Holt (1872-1951), eighth president of the College, coined the term Golden Personalities - "men and women of learning whose sole love was teaching, who enjoyed associating with young people, individuals with noble characters." Over his tenure of twenty-five years (1925-1949), Holt dedicated himself to the task of bringing such people to Winter Park. To honor Holt, this project seeks to document the lives of leading citizens of both Rollins College and the City of Winter Park. Those deceased figures include not only the founding fathers and early settlers, pioneers and leaders in education, but also influential individuals of town and gown, and community advocates among others. The members of the project team include: Alia Alli ('11), Angelica Garcia ('10), David Irvin ('10) and Kerem Rivera ('10), with Professors Wenxian Zhang of College Archives and Julian Chambliss of History Department as faculty leaders. This research project would not be possible without the generous support from the Dean of Faculty Office, and Dr. Thomas Moore, the Coordinator of Rollins Student-Faculty Collaborative Research Program. The project team also would like to thank Trudy Laframboise of Rollins Archives, Barbara White of Winter Park Public Library, and Fairolyn Livingston of the Winter Park Heritage Center for their research assistance, and Paul Gindlesperger of Olin Library for his technical support in web design.
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    • Jazz in Florida
      Jazz music emerged in the late 19th and early 20th centuries utilizing a variety of musical devices, including improvisation, polyrhythms, and syncopation. In Florida, Jazz groups (musicians and listeners) play an important role in the local music scene. In the early years of jazz music, venues consisted of mainly nightclubs and dance halls. By the 1940’s and 1950’s Jazz was at its height in popularity. Public interest declined around the same time, in part due to the changes in mainstream music, specifically the birth of rock and roll. Today jazz music is performed in a variety of venues and contexts, a mixture of nightclubs, restaurants, theaters, and music festivals. This exhibit explores the function of Jazz in Florida from its emergence in the early 20th century until today. Including historical narratives and legal accounts of the music and dancing scenes in the Tampa Bay area.
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    • Murphy’s Well Being
      An EmerAgency "konsult" in the form of a dual-channel video installation driven by a custom multi-touch table. Performing as a quasi-corporate consultancy, the Florida Research Ensemble (FRE) looked at the Cabot-Koppers EPA Superfund site and made public-policy recommendations alternative to the scientific, governmental or corporate positions to which we are accustomed. The work proposed that a cultural emphasis on "well-being" might mitigate disaster, and that attention to the mechanism of desire might alter our current environmental trajectory. The FRE team created a "kiosk" one might expect to find in a corporate lobby that drives a database of animations, video interviews and documentary footage.
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    • Particles in Space
      Particles in Space is an on-going exhibition and research project that converges digital humanities practices with the histories and study of experimental film & video. Building on the field of Volumetric Cinema first developed by Kevin L. Ferguson, the moving-image works examined in this series are digitally disassembled and rendered in three-dimensions using FFmpeg and the open-source image analysis software, ImageJ. Transformed from their original photochemical or electronic formats into 3D objects, we are able to study and experience these works in entirely new ways that are unconstrained by conventional theories and practices of cinematic spectatorship.
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    • RICHES
      RICHES™ is an interdisciplinary digital project that partners with multiple academic units at the University of Central Florida, six other Florida universities, and commercial and nonprofit sectors of the community. The project has two goals: 1) to serve as a model for documenting regional history, especially “hidden” history and culture, through an interactive database that draws from multiple repositories and personal collections, and 2) to develop new digital tools for historians.
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    • Sites that Speak: Mapping Performing Arts Spaces in Spanish Miami
      Sites that Speak is a multimodal publication that focuses on the development of Spanish theater in Miami through the re-search of its performing spaces from 1959 to 1980. It maps-- literally and figuratively-- the development of Spanish theater from garages to warehouses, from Teatro Martí --a Ku Klux Klan meeting space in the 40s-- to the Gables Cinematheque, previous home of Teatro Avante. By doing a deep cultural mapping of Spanish theater in Miami, I demonstrate the ways in which claiming a space as a theatrical space, in addition to adding to the cultural development of our city, has contributed to the survival of theater as an art form, as intangible cultural heritage of a community in the making. In so doing, I also analyze the economic and socio-political transformation of the different communities that have contributed to the transformation of Miami into a global city.
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    • The Genius Project
      A working laboratory in landscape restoration and living model of sustainability.
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    • The Rollins Oral History Archive
      IN ORDER TO document the history of the liberal arts education at Rollins College, interviews were conducted with selected faculty, alumni, staff and administrators, who have served the college for a significant number of years or made noteworthy contributions during their tenures at Rollins. These interviews prompted the participants to reflect upon their years at Rollins, the challenges they have faced and the accomplishments of their careers in leadership, teaching, scholarship, and community services.
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    • The Vodou Archive
      The Archive of Haitian Religion and Culture: Collaborative Research and Scholarship on Haiti and the Haitian Diaspora will create a freely accessible multimedia digital library that uses audiovisual technologies to curate, elucidate and facilitate the advanced search of the rich primary materials of a central Haitian and Haitian-American spiritual tradition in order to promote discovery and educate a broad public.
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    • The WWI Diary of Albert Huet
      In 2016, the University of Florida digitized my great-grandfather’s diary of his experience and life as a soldier during World War I in France. One year later, they added additional documents such as photos, and I created a collection in the University of Florida’s Digital Collections. On my website, you will find the diary (which starts on page 5) as well as the additional documents. The diary is accompanied by a transcription of the text as is, a standardized French version of the text, and an English transcription. For more information, check “The Translation Project” tab. In 2020 I added another component to the project. I created a digital map using the tool StoryMapJS from Knightlab. This map is based on Albert’s diary, in which he recollected his war experience. Each location connects to a specific page in the diary and for each entry, I provide short explanations in both French and English. The map is available on the “WWI Diary of Albert Huet: the Map” tab.
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    • Unearthing St. Augustine
      The University of Florida (UF) has partnered with the City of St. Augustine to "unearth" archival repositories which have been previously inaccessible to researchers worldwide. The digital archive supports research in a broad range of subjects: Florida and U.S. history, Spanish colonies, Native Americans, slavery, exploration, architecture and urban planning, social and economic development, missionary work, military defenses and warfare. Currently, over 25,000 photographs, maps, overlays of the city, architectural drawings, government records, transcriptions of key Spanish documents, and archaeology site summaries have been digitized, with a majority of them geo-located. The collection not only satisfies the needs of a wide variety of researchers including historians, archaeologists, architects, historic preservationists, and those in the digital humanities, but the project also helps in telling St. Augustine's unique "story" of colonial heritage on a global scale.
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    • Veteran’s Legacy Project
      In May 2016, Under Secretary Ron Walters of the National Cemetery Administration (NCA) launched the Veterans Legacy Program (VLP). His vision for the VLP is “to memorialize Veterans’ service to the nation by telling their stories.” The VLP’s goal, according to Dr. Bryce Carpenter, NCA’s Educational Outreach Program Officer, is to partner with “academic communities”–scholars and students–to conduct “research about veterans’ lives, veterans in their local cemeteries” and to be able to share these stories of service and sacrifice from the 136 national cemeteries with younger students and the general public. In 2017, the NCA selected UCF as one of three schools awarded contracts as inaugural VLP partners. In 2018, it became one of nine schools participating in the VLP nationwide. As Dr. Barbara Gannon has stated, UCF “was made for this program.” The History Department and the Center for Humanities and Digital Research (CHDR) are committed to doing publicly engaged research. Our partnership with NCA builds on a number of ongoing and relevant research projects, including the UCF Community Veterans History Project and RICHES digital archive. Undergraduate and graduate students in UCF courses in 2017 and 2018 created digital learning tools, conducted research to find primary sources, and wrote biographies of over 130 veterans commemorated at four national cemeteries—two in Florida and two in eastern France: Florida National Cemetery, St. Augustine National Cemetery, the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery. In 2018, our research focused on the history of two major conflicts in US history: the Seminole Wars and World War I. Over many months, our team of graduate and undergraduate research assistants wrote, edited and finalized biographies, created digital resources, assisted area K-12 teachers in the construction of instructional materials, and assisted with the website. Our partnership honors veterans and brings cemeteries alive for students—at universities, elementary, middle and high schools—through a range of instructional materials and interactive digital history tools. A big part of this partnership is to showcase “what the humanities can do in a real world setting.” As Dr. Caroline Cheong describes it, we show students how scholars work in the field, interact with the community, and breathe life into history by “telling the stories of our nation’s veterans.”
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    • We Wanted Some Basic Human Rights: The Civil Rights Struggle in Tampa
      This web exhibition examines the history of the Civil Rights Movement in Tampa and its environs. It utilizes documents located in the Special Collections Division of the USF Tampa library. This exhibition was produced during a Spring 2016 seminar on the Civil Rights Movement, taught by Dr. K. Stephen Prince of the USF history department. Students consulted more than fifteen archival collections housed in the USF Tampa Library, selecting a representative sample of documents to reproduce here. Short analytical headnotes will guide readers through the narrative. Links to the documents are also provided.
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    • Zora Neale Hurston Digital Archive
      Launched in 2006 by Anna Lillios, Mark L. Kamrath, and J.D. Applen, the Zora Neale Hurston Digital Archive has two goals. Its primary purpose is to provide an academic site that will provide a repository of biographical, historical, critical, and other contextual materials related to Hurston's life and work. The site also seeks to make available various teaching resources so that both teachers and students can more fully appreciate the cultural and literary richness of Hurston's numerous writings. With time and funding, we hope to also develop a digital edition of Hurston's writings. A secondary goal of the site is to work closely with the city of Eatonville, Florida, The Association to Preserve the Eatonville Community, and other interested parties in documenting Hurston's accomplishments both as a regional ethnographer and anthropologist and one of the world's most talented African–American women writers.
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